post id- 9784post_type - food_wine_pairing
is_single - yes
current_user_id -
in_array - no
is_allowed - no
Array ( [0] => 9768 [1] => 9773 [2] => 9770 [3] => 9771 [4] => 9769 [5] => 9772 [6] => 9779 [7] => 9775 [8] => 9776 [9] => 9778 [10] => 9777 [11] => 9774 [12] => 9786 [13] => 9785 [14] => 9784 [15] => 9783 [16] => 9781 [17] => 9782 [18] => 9793 [19] => 9792 [20] => 9791 [21] => 9789 [22] => 9790 [23] => 9788 [24] => 9787 [25] => 9795 [26] => 9183 [27] => 10064 [28] => 10065 [29] => 10044 [30] => 10067 [31] => 10066 [32] => 10060 )
post id- 9784post_type - food_wine_pairing
is_single - yes
current_user_id -
in_array - no
is_allowed - no
Array ( [0] => 9768 [1] => 9773 [2] => 9770 [3] => 9771 [4] => 9769 [5] => 9772 [6] => 9779 [7] => 9775 [8] => 9776 [9] => 9778 [10] => 9777 [11] => 9774 [12] => 9786 [13] => 9785 [14] => 9784 [15] => 9783 [16] => 9781 [17] => 9782 [18] => 9793 [19] => 9792 [20] => 9791 [21] => 9789 [22] => 9790 [23] => 9788 [24] => 9787 [25] => 9795 [26] => 9183 [27] => 10064 [28] => 10065 [29] => 10044 [30] => 10067 [31] => 10066 [32] => 10060 )

Beef fajitas

Judith Papesh, Contributor
Wine Pairings:  

As the weather warms in May, beef steak fajitas are a quick and easy small or big crowd-pleaser. Hot, spicy, beefy, and loaded with caramelized onions and peppers, it’s hard to imagine anyone not diving in.

That array of spicy, smoky, beefy fajita wonders creates an interesting opportunity for wine pairing. We’re taking advantage of those bold flavors from ingredients and cooking methods to get the T2 Cellars 2018 GSM to the table. This wine brings a smooth and mouth-filling black cherry explosion, hints of nectarine and dried herbs that complement the smoky flavors of the steak and the caramelized onions and peppers. It’s a big wine for big tastes and not to mention big fun with these fajitas!

Ingredients

Dry rub
  • 1 teaspoon light brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Fajitas
  • 1 pound skirt steak  (or flank steak)
  • 3 multi-colored bell peppers, cut into thick strips
  • 1 large yellow onion, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1/4 cup packed fresh cilantro
For serving
  • Iceberg lettuce, shredded
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 8 small flour tortillas, warmed

Steps

1.

Make the dry rub for the steak

Whisk together the brown sugar, chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, paprika, 1 1/2 teaspoons salt and 1/2 teaspoon of black pepper in a small mixing bowl.

2.

Prepare the steak and vegetables

Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Set the skirt steak in the center and cover with half of the spice mixture, rub the spices into the steak. Turn the steak over and cover with the remaining spice mixture and rub it into the steak.  Let the steak rest temperature for about 30 minutes to absorb the spices and come up to room temperature.

3.

Heat a grill pan over medium – high heat for 5 minutes.

4.

While the pan heats, add the bell peppers and onions to a large mixing bowl. Drizzle with the olive oil and sprinkle generously with salt and pepper.

5.

Add the peppers and onions to the grill pan and cook until softened, about 8 to 10 minutes. Remove the grilled vegetables to a serving platter. Cover the platter with aluminum foil to keep the vegetables warm.

6.

Brush the hot grill pan with the vegetable oil and grill the steak for 3 minutes. Turn the steak and cook another 3 minutes. Transfer the grilled steak to a cutting board and cover with foil.  Rest the steak for at least 5 minutes.

7.

Slice the steak into thin strips, being sure to cut against the grain of the meat for a tender piece. Add the steak to the platter of warm vegetables and sprinkle with the cilantro leaves.

About Judith Papesh, Contributor

Retired Winemaker, Winemaking Consultant, and Washington State Licensed Geologist. Bourgogne Master Level Certification, French, Italian, and Spanish Wine Scholar Certifications

In the first class to complete Washington State University (WSU) Extension Enology Certification, Judith opened her winery, crafting wines that garnered local and international acclaim before turning her attention to studying and educating about the world's wines. 

"Winemaking is very much an art as well as a science; it is a consuming passion that drives you during the day, keeps you up at night, and when the wine is right, simply leaves you breathless."