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Mushroom bourguignon

Dave Adams, home chef at Rising Wines Collective
Wine Pairings:  

This recipe was inspired by the traditional French dish, with its robust, savory flavors pairing beautifully with a wide assortment of red wines. Still, I usually opt for tradition by serving this bourguignon alongside an expression of Pinot Noir or Burgundy as the perfect match. 

Since mushrooms are subbing for beef in this case, I’d suggest you splurge on more luxurious varieties, like a mix of brown crimini, shitake, and portobello, but any fresh mushroom will work. I recommend cutting some of them into larger chunks since smaller pieces will easily get lost in the rich gravy once they shrink. 

Time-saving tip: Cruise the frozen food section at your grocery for pre-peeled pearl onions, they are indistinguishable from fresh, and it’ll save you a ton of peeling (and crying) time. For the cooking wine, think of something reasonably priced but good enough to enjoy on its own rather than polluting your bourguignon with bargain basement plonk; you’ll taste the difference!

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 pounds mixed mushrooms, cut into chunks
  • ½ cup pearl onions
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and sliced
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup good drinking red wine
  • 3 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon dark miso paste
  • 2 tablespoons soy or tamari sauce
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon butter or plant-based butter substitute

Steps

1.

Heat the olive oil in a large, high-sided sauté pan or skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the onion and cook until golden, about 3-5 minutes, stirring often. Then, add the garlic and sauté for another minute.

2.

Add the mushrooms along with the black pepper and continue cooking until they start to brown and have released most of their liquid, about 10 minutes. Then add the salt and mix well.

3.

Add the carrots, stir for another 3 minutes, then add the pearl onions.

4.

While the vegetables are cooking, heat the vegetable broth (it doesn’t need to be boiling, just hot), and add the miso paste to dissolve. Set it aside.

5.

If your tomato paste is from a can, move the vegetables away from the center of the pan, add the paste, and stir it for a minute to reduce the tinny taste.

6.

Add the rest of the ingredients, stir well, and slowly simmer. Cover loosely and continue to simmer for 15-20 minutes until the carrots are tender and the liquid has become a thick sauce.

7.

Remove from heat, discard the bay leaves, garnish with chopped parsley, and top with grated parmesan cheese (or a plant-based substitute).

8.

Serve over pasta, mashed potatoes, or soft polenta.

About Dave Adams, home chef at Rising Wines Collective

Dave Adams is not a professional chef but is a devoted home cook who strives to make memorable vegetarian and vegan meals that appeal to the people who populate his life, including adults and children. Dave is a "Negan" (nearly vegan), so vegans, please don't lose your mind if he recommends butter or cheese now and again. Since Dave is also a "wanna-be wine snob" and co-hosts the Decanted Wine Podcast (www.decantedpodcast.com), food and wine pairing is an essential component of his lifestyle. Dave is also dedicated to the art of "Dad jokes," to the bemusement of everyone in his household.