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Chicken Chasseur

Judith Papesh, Contributor
Wine Pairings:  

T2 Cellars is noted for its food-friendly wines, and the 2018 GSM makes a dynamic wine pairing with the French dish Chicken Chasseur. Also known as Hunters Chicken, Chicken Chasseur builds rich flavors from the seasoned flour for the chicken sauté in butter and olive oil to the sophisticated touch of cognac and veal stock.

Reward your culinary efforts and complement this dish’s rich, earthy character, with a great GSM. The T2 Cellars wine is 55% Syrah, 30% Grenache and 15% Mourvèdre and loaded with aromas of black cherry, red berries earth and dried herbs that deliver a smooth medium to full-bodied wine with plenty of acid and tannin to manage the richness of the chicken.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds bone-in chicken breasts with skin on
  • ½ cup flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoon butter, divided
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoon shallots, diced
  • 1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • 1/4 cup cognac
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine
  • 2 cups veal stock (substitute equal parts chicken and beef stock if needed)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh tarragon, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
Sea salt Freshly ground pepper

Steps

1.

Preheat the oven to 350 F.

2.

Stir together the flour, salt and pepper in a rimmed tray. Pat the chicken breasts dry with a paper towel then place in the seasoned flour and gently shake until coated on all sides, removing any excess. Set aside on a plate.

3.

Melt the butter and olive oil in a large saute pan over medium to high heat. Add the floured chicken pieces to the pan leaving space between them. Cook the chicken until lightly browned for about 4 minutes then flipping and continuing to cook for about 8 minutes in total. Put the chicken in a roasting pan and continue to cook in the oven for another 25 minutes. Remove the chicken pieces to a clean platter and keep warm while finishing the sauce.

4.

Add the mushrooms to the pan and saute over medium heat for 1 to 2 minutes then add the shallots and saute for an1 additional minute. With the pan off the heat, carefully add the cognac and flambe the mushrooms and shallots, cooking until the flame disappears. ( Follow this guide on how to safely flambe foods). Return the pan to the burner and deglaze with white wine.

5.

Add the veal stock to the pan and heat on low till the liquid is reduced and thickened. Add the tablespoon of butter, tarragon and parsley and stir till the butter is melted. Season with sea salt and pepper to taste. Add the chicken pieces back to the pan and heat over low heat for 5 minutes to warm them through.   To serve: Place a piece of chicken in a shallow bowl and cover with the mushroom sauce. Garnish with more parsley and tarragon.

Chef Image

About Judith Papesh, Contributor